RSDM News

After Years of Severe Tooth Decay, RSDM Faculty Help Patient Regain her Smile

Carrie Stetler | January 7, 2019

As a child, Gemma Boyer loved to pose for pictures, flashing her wide toothy grin. But because she has Sjogren’s syndrome — which dries moisture from the eyes and mouth — her teeth became badly decayed. By her late teens, she no longer wanted to show off her smile. That changed once Dr. Mohamed Kamel, an RSDM professor who also practices with Rutgers Health University Dental Associates, created dentures for her and, later, dental implants.

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At a Nepal Dental School, Faculty Member Shares Knowledge

Carrie Stetler | January 7, 2019

In the mountains of Nepal, many villagers enjoy chewing tobacco, increasing their risk for oral cancer. Oral pathology is vital in diagnosing the disease, but information and technology, often lag behind advances in the U.S. and more developed nations. Dr. Shruti Kasihkar, an RSDM assistant professor of Oral Pathology, shared knowledge and updates at a Nepalese dental school recently.

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Thanks to RSDM Surgeon, Teen Recovers from Severe Nerve Damage

Carrie Stetler | January 7, 2019

After surgery to remove her wisdom teeth, patient Madie Nicpon lost her sense of taste and felt a numbness in her tongue that caused her to bite it, sometimes drawing blood. She also developed a lisp. Eventually, her family turned to RSDM oral and maxillofacial surgeon Dr. Vincent Ziccardi, who diagnosed damage to her lingual nerve and performed nerve graft microsurgery, resulting in complete recovery.

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Student Uses Dental Calculus to Study Effects of Industrial Age

Carrie Stetler | November 15, 2018

Scientists know that teeth can provide important clues to everything from prehistoric creatures to crime scene information. One Rutgers student is working with RSDM researchers to explore what teeth can reveal about diet and health during and after the industrial revolution. LaShanda Williams, a Ph.D. student at the Rutgers Center for Evolutionary Studies in New Brunswick, believes that dental calculus might provide information that can’t be found anywhere else.

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